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THE COMMON MISCONCEPTION ABOUT CONCRETE

THE COMMON MISCONCEPTION ABOUT CONCRETE

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Misconception 1: “I would choose concrete, but it’s just not very pretty.” I was this way once, believing that concrete was some ugly, cracked thing that I just walked on when I decided the sidewalk was better than the huge muddy half grass/half dirt lawn in front of a building. Just take a gander at this guy. When it is stained and polished well, like Concreate, Inc. does, it can look like this.

Misconception 2: “If I got a concrete floor, I would just be slipping all the time.” I mean, I wouldn’t advise you to throw a tub of oil on the floor and then run full speed at it carrying a bunch of your kitchen knives, but you know, to each his own. It is definitely a smooth surface, but despite its very slick look, it isn’t what you think. Now, if you see a very slick looking man, that “it isn’t what you think” motto doesn’t always apply. I’m talking about floors, don’t let that motto escalate so quickly. And don’t blame me for being conned into a situation. Slick looking men and slick looking floors are two totally different things. Concrete exceeds ADA and OSHA requirements for both wet and dry traction.

Misconception 3: “Concrete is so cold.” It is definitely cooler, but it actually helps you out. (You can Google this if you don’t believe me–I think that’s a little rude, you not trusting me and all, but you know, do your Google thing. See if I care.) Concrete has a high “thermal capacity” meaning, simply, it can hold a lot of heat. So, it’s pretty hot in the day and the concrete is all cool on your feet, making you feel good about yourself and everything (that concrete is so encouraging) and then, at night, things change. During the day, the concrete absorbed heat and as the temperature drops it starts giving that same heat off, warming up the cooler surroundings. Try and beat that option with your dinky tile floor…I’m sorry, dinky may have been a little too sassy, I just am a little heated, you could say, about the whole Google/you not trusting me thing. I’m trying to move past it.

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Misconception 4: “But it’s gray and pretty drab looking.” False, it is not drab. It is true that a lot of concrete can look gray (this is because of the Portland Cement it is mixed with), but even that is always subject to change. The ability to stain and dye concrete (beginning in the late 1800s to the early 1900s) has given you so manyPolished concrete floor vt options. It’s like BAM! You want color coming out of your yin yang? Then you won’t believe what concrete stains and dyes have in store for you. It is easy to assume that the concrete you are picturing is all that is out there, but it isn’t. Frank Lloyd Wright, often called the greatest architect of all time, used quite a bit of concrete in his innovative designs. Not drab. Awesome.

Misconception 5: “My concrete was poured a few years ago, and so, I’m sure it can’t be stained and polished anymore.” Nope. As long as it’s structurally sound, you can still do it. Concreate, Inc. has stained and polished a slab of concrete that is 100 years old. And just when you thought plastic surgery was only for those in a mid-life crisis, it’s not. Embrace the centurion concrete slabs and their newly redone selves.

Misconception 6: “I would love to get my concrete sealed so it’s nice and shiny.” Okay, this one makes sense. Though, to be honest, the others make complete sense too. We’ve been trained to believe that sealers have magical powers, magical “shine” powers. Concrete, however, gets its shine through grinding. Pre-grind all the divots, bumps, and pits in the concrete absorb light. Now, when you grind it, it smooths the surface out ridding it of those and allowing the concrete to actual reflect the light, hence, the shine. A sealer helps protect the concrete from weathering and keep it looking shiny.

Concrete probably isn’t a part of your normal every day conversation. Which, while that’s sad, is pretty understandable. While I spend a majority of my time researching, talking about, and writing about concrete, I know others may not think that it is the most exciting of topics. Now, when that rare conversation comes up, you will be in the know. You’ll be rock solid on all the facts. (Also, I’m winking at you right now, that was my concrete pun of the day.)

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